OH’s Jared Spector and Kaylee Cunningham Win Congressional App Challenge

U.S. Congressman Ted Deutch (second from left) presented Olympic Heights Engineering Academy students Jared Spector (far left) and Kaylee Cunningham (third from left) with Congressional Commendations for winning a computer application design competition. Engineering teacher Ms. Nimmi (far right) was on hand for the presentation.

U.S. Congressman Ted Deutch (second from left) presented Olympic Heights Engineering Academy students Jared Spector (far left) and Kaylee Cunningham (third from left) with Congressional Commendations for winning a computer application design competition. Engineering teacher Ms. Nimmi (far right) was on hand for the presentation.

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Olympic Heights Engineering Academy students senior Jared Spector and sophomore Kaylee Cunningham were named the winners of the Congressional App Challenge for Florida’s 21st Congressional District which includes portions of Palm Beach and Broward Counties.

Spector and Cunningham were presented with official U.S. Congressional certificates of commendation for their accomplishment by District 21 Rep. Ted Deutch on Feb. 18 in Engineering teacher Ms. Nirmala “Miss Nimmi” Arunachaalam’s classroom. The winning apps from across the country will be displayed in Congress on March 1.

Spector and Cunningham winning entry is the Number Ninja app, designed to help students understand and practice math concepts. The app deals with lessons ranging from how to calculate the slope  of a line between two points to Pythagorean theroum.

The app provides the lessons and will randomly generate practice problems for the user to work on, as well as allow to check his or work against the correct answers to the practice problems.

The Congressional App Challenge is aimed at encouraging high school students to learn how to code by creating their own software application for mobile, tablet, or other computing device on a platform of their choice. The entries were judged by a panel of local computer science professionals and Congressional representatives.

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